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OneWheel: What is it and What are the Risks?

OneWheel: What is it and What are the Risks?
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Throughout the sunshine state, one might notice numerous transportation methods on any day of the week: Bicycles, skateboards, rollerblades, mopeds, scooters, and even golf carts are fair game. But, in recent years, a new player in the game has evolved – the OneWheel. OneWheel is a mobility device that enables users to stand on a deck (like a skateboard) while propelled by a single tire. While the OneWheel is supposed to be a fun and cost-efficient way for riders to get around quicker, it is proving to be a dangerous device due to several possible defects.

What is a OneWheel?

OneWheel devices are one-wheeled, battery-powered, self-balancing recreational transportation devices. Riders can propel themselves forward by using their body weight, position, and balance. Onewheel devices accelerate based on balance. Riders lean forward to accelerate the device, lean backward to decelerate, and use heel-toe pressure to lean in the direction they wish to turn.

Riding a OneWheel
OneWheel riders lean forward to accelerate the device, lean backward to decelerate, and use heel-toe pressure to lean in the direction they wish to turn.

OneWheel is the first product launched by the company called Future Motion Inc. They now sell the OneWheel and the OneWheel XR.

Is the OneWheel Safe?

Although the OneWheel is a fun, fast, and cost-efficient way of getting around, it proves to be a dangerous device due to several possible defects. The first defect is known as the OneWheel nosedive.

The OneWheel nosedive is when the motor shuts off mid-ride and slams forward into the ground, which causes the unsuspecting rider to nosedive off the OneWheel to the ground. The battery will shut off when it no longer has enough power to keep the board balanced to propel you forward.

Secondly, Onewheel devices have a pushback feature, that warns the rider of low battery, overcharging, and unsafe speeds. Once the Onewheel device has reached its maximum speed or low battery, the board is to “push up” to warn the rider. Although this design feature is for safety, many riders involved in OneWheel accidents report never feeling pushback – either because pushback never occurred or because pushback was not sufficient for riders. The pushback feature of the OneWheel cuts the motor off and serves as a warning to the rider that they need to get the device on a charger.

Injuries You Can Sustain from a Nosedive

The OneWheel can reach speeds of up to 20 mph or more. When a rider nosedives off the device, it can lead to long-lasting, potentially serious injuries.

Some of the common injuries that can occur are:

  • Broken extremities
  • Head trauma
  • Concussions
  • Neck injuries
  • Broken collarbones
  • Facial fractures
  • Punctured lungs
  • Death

There are several wrongful death cases against Future Motion, Inc., the creators of OneWheel. If you believe you may have grounds to file a Onewheel accident lawsuit, do not hesitate to get in touch with our team. You can contact our firm today at 727-669-2828 or visit our website to schedule your risk-free case obligation.

*Terence A. Perenich, Esquire

Perenich Law injury Attorneys

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